Day-Trip Democracy, an Evidence Based Mash-up

Introduction

Citizens in a democracy face the same access physics on election day, worldwide. Administrative access to the polling place can be hampered in a variety of ways, but physical access to the polling place retains many common quantitative relationships to every day activities. The voting process is a day trip with a goal.

Methods

The mechanics of contests and the mechanics of trips can differ. For example, in a automobile race (Fromula One or Indianapolis 500) or a Track & Field Sprint, no extra credit is given to path taken, as long as one stays on the track. In this case, distance is the goal.

Other types of contests depend upon speed made good towards a goal ...

If you work or vote at a constant location, then this relation applies:

DistanceToGoal (SUM leg distance) = SUM (SpeedMadeGood (leg) x TimeMadeGood (leg)) = Over_the_River_and_Through_the_Woods

With reference to the picture above, the horizontial axis is TimeMadeGood and the points on the circle are the DistanceToGoal.

The correction factor is DistanceToGoal = (2 x Distance (work))/sqrt(2)

Results

The US Census publishes TimeMadeGood(work) by United States,State and County.

The official definition is:GCT0801:MEAN TRAVEL TIME TO WORK OF WORKERS 16 YEARS AND OVER WHO DID NOT WORK AT HOME (MINUTES).

Data for the US, (50+) States including Texas and (254) Texas Counties (where available) is ranked by the length of the round trip (2x) DistanceToGoal (e.g. voting) at a constant SpeedMadeGood of 65 mph.

Results

Conclusions